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Constellation: Alonzo King Lines Ballet at the Joyce, 2014….

Michael Montgomery, Ricardo Zayas, Keelan Whitmore & Ashely Jackson in Alonzo King’s “Constellation”. Photo by Margo Moritz.

Michael Montgomery, Ricardo Zayas, Keelan Whitmore & Ashely Jackson in Alonzo King’s “Constellation”. Photo by Margo Moritz.

Alonzo King’s Constellation is a much different program than that offered during Alonzo King Lines Ballet’s 2012 NYC Season at the Joyce. Resin, which premiered in 2011, was a work of passion and physicality that incurred a deep emotional response. For the score, Mr. King explored Sephardic songs from Turkey, Morocco, Spain, and Yemen, including children’s songs and religious songs, with them you heard the pain and suffering of the Jewish Diaspora.

Where Resin was a work of emotion, Mr. King’s Constellation, which premiered in 2012, is work of the spiritual. It is danced in soft shoes and is shown in 19 sections in 75 minutes. Set Designer Jim Campbell and lighting designer Axel Morgenthaler created a backdrop of glowing orbs, small lights like the stars in the constellation amongst a sea of blackness. Israeli mezzo-soprano Maya Lahyani would enter and exist through the production, singing excerpts from Vivaldi, Strauss or Handel, her voice weaving a web of mysticism, lending a touch of magic.

Michael Montgomery in Alonzo King’s “Constellation”. Photo by Margo Moritz.

Michael Montgomery in Alonzo King’s “Constellation”. Photo by Margo Moritz.

Filled with duets and solos, the dancers were allowed to shine. Mr. King’s choreography is hard to describe with words, his utilizes the classical vocabulary when needed and discards it when not. There is a freedom found in the constant movement in which the dancers sometimes move in unison but often times not. But even when dancers are not moving in unison, there is still a shared theme, movements that are repetitive within the phrasing but slightly different for each dancer.

If you have never seen Courtney Henry dance than you have done yourself a great injustice. Ms. Henry, who was a finalist in the prestigious Youth American Grand Prix “Stars of Tomorrow” program in New York City, is a dancer that was born to dance.  When I see her I am reminded of some on the great contemporary ballerina of our time, Sylvie Guillem or Wendy Whelan. Yes, she’s that good.

The duet between Micheal Montgomery and Babatunji was a thing to behold. Filled with turns that finished with elongated limbs, it was a display of competitive camaraderie. A sense of each dancer pushing the other to be stronger, better….

The pairing of Ms. Henry with Mr. Montgomery was a stroke of genius. Their movement qualities were perfectly matched. Their dancing created a moment when time was suspended, nothing else in the universe matter. Both lithe and long-limbed, they flowed organically with and around one another.

Keelan Whitmore in Alonzo King’s “Constellation”. Photo by Margo Moritz.

Keelan Whitmore in Alonzo King’s “Constellation”. Photo by Margo Moritz.

Original score composers Ben Juodvalkis and Leslie Stuck with Sound Designer Christopher Barnett create a colorful tapestry of sound. You could hear the wind, bells or birds calling while in flight, these are intermixed with romantic melodies by violin and cello.

Yujin Kim’s solo is another moment within Constellation in which time stops, the emotionality of her movements is undeniable. When a small ball is rolled on stage, she picks it up and it becomes a thing cherished that is then shared with another.

Yujin Kim & Zachary Tang in Alonzo King’s “Constellation”. Photo by Margo Moritz.

Yujin Kim & Zachary Tang in Alonzo King’s “Constellation”. Photo by Margo Moritz.

Mr. King is unafraid to allow the body to be seen in brief moments of awkwardness. Elbows hyper-extended and crossing one another or in the way two dancers may move in relationship to each other. The woman bent over and the man to the side picks her up and down in quick small lifts, she awkwardly hangs from his body as he turns and then he lifts her to chest level as she elongates her body into a beautiful line.

Alonzo King LINES Ballet is a celebrated contemporary ballet company that has been guided since 1982 by the unique artistic vision of Alonzo King. Collaborating with noted composers, musicians, and visual artists from around the world, Alonzo King creates works that draw on a diverse set of deeply rooted cultural traditions, imbuing classical ballet with new expressive potential. Alonzo King understands ballet as a science – founded on universal, geometric principles of energy and evolution – and continues to develop a new language of movement from its classical forms and techniques. Alonzo King’s visionary choreography, brought to life by the extraordinary LINES Ballet dancers, is renowned for connecting audiences to a profound sense of shared humanity.

Sidra Bell Dance New York 2014 NYC Season, May 8-11 & May 15-17….

Sidra

Sidra Bell’s latest evening length events attempt to rescue the individual by constructing two new worlds that navigate popular zeitgeists.

Conceived through materials, K I N G D O M (World Premiere Tanz Farm, Atlanta) & garment (World Premiere Kelly Strayhorn Theater, Pittsburgh) use small performance ceremonies to observe antiquation, literacy, transfiguration, and reformation.

K I N G D O M

New York City Premiere

garment

New York City Premiere

Presented by

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East 25th St btw Lexington & 3rd Aves.

New York City

TICKETS

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Program A at the New York City Center, 2014…

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Katherine Crockett as Clytemnestra in Martha Graham’s “Clytemnestra”

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Katherine Crockett as Clytemnestra in Martha Graham’s “Clytemnestra”

Few dance companies, especially modern dance companies have had the staying power of the Martha Graham Dance Company, celebrating its 88th Season at New York City Center. Martha Graham’s influence on dance has been compared to Picasso’s on painting, Stravinsky’s on music and Frank Lloyd Wright on architecture. She collaborated and commissioned works from some of the leading artist of her day, she had a close working relationship with American-Japanese sculptor Isamu Noguchi. The top fashion designers in the world dressed her for the stage, Halston, Calvin Klein and Donna Karan. The score she commissioned from Aaron Copeland in 1944, Appalachian Spring, won the Pulitzer Prize for Music the following year in 1945.

The Company’s 88th Season was labeled Myth and Transformation, revered Graham masterpieces were seen alongside newly commissioned works by two of the world’s foremost choreographers… Andonis Foniadakis and Nacho Duato.

Program A opened with a new one-hour production of Ms. Graham’s Clytemnestra. The original Clytemnestra, which premiered in 1958, is easily considered one of her greatest works from her Greek Cycle. It is Ms. Graham’s only full-evening work and presented in three acts. The Playbill listed the choreography for the new one-hour production as Ms. Graham’s with arrangement by Janet Eilber and Linda Hodes.

The original production was commissioned by Bathsabée de Rothschild with an original score by Egyptian composer Halim El-Dabh. Isamu Noguchi designed a series of set pieces that the transformed the stage from the Underworld to the Royal Palace and then to the Queen’s bedroom.It is the torrid tale as seen from the perspective of Mycenae’s (Argos) inimical Queen, Clytemnestra.

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Blakeley White-McGuire  as Electra & Abdiel Jacobsen as Orestes in Martha Graham’s “Clytemnestra”

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Blakeley White-McGuire as Electra & Abdiel Jacobsen as Orestes in Martha Graham’s “Clytemnestra”

Clytemnestra has been planning to seek revenge for Agamemnon’s sacrifice of their daughter, Iphigenia, and partly because in the ten years of Agamemnon’s absence during the Trojan War, Clytemnestra has entered into an adulterous relationship with Aegisthus, Agamemnon’s cousin. Clytemnestra deceives her husband Agamemnon into stepping onto a red cloth that is reserved for the gods which means his death.

The Furies gather for they know what is to come. The captured Princess Cassandra, who Agamemnon has taken as a mistress, foresees what is to come but is believed by no-one. Helen of Troy is seen lamenting what her abduction has caused. Clytemnestra and Aegisthus fall into bed after a night of drunken celebration. During the night she is awakened by the ghost of Agamemnon who spurs Electra and Orestes, their other two offspring, to avenge his murder by killing their mother and her lover. Now that is a lot to cram into an hour…

Over the years I have had the opportunity to see Clytemnestra in its entirety several times and it is one of my favorite Graham works. So I was curious as to whether this new reduced-revised-shrunken version would work…I sorry to report it did not…

It is just too much information, too much going on to try to complete in an hour. The stage seemed too crowded by the use of all the sets Noguchi had created for the production, a throne, a bed, large red swords that form a cross…. I remember settling in when the work was shown at  BAM and watching the plot unfold…but, unfortunately there was no chance to do that with this one-hour production…Neither Katherine Crockett as Clytemnestra or Ben Schultz as Hades were allowed the leisure of truly developing their characters on stage…

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Lorenzo Pagano & PeiJu Chien-Pott in Andonis Foniadakis’s “Echo”.

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Lorenzo Pagano & PeiJu Chien-Pott in Andonis Foniadakis’s “Echo”.

During the intermission, I meet with three professional dancers, part of the younger generation that this new one-hour version was supposed to reach. To them it appeared everything was rushed, the subtitles between scenes just did not work…and they commented on how the stage seemed so crowded with the dancers, all the props plus the set.

The old adage is…if ain’t broken don’t fix it…I felt a brilliant piece of dance history and a stellar part of Ms. Graham’s Greek Cycle had been forcible dumbed down and I, for one, feel somewhat insulted….

I mean, come on…betrayal, unfaithfulness, retribution plus a lot of grief and agony then you have remorse thrown in for good measure, now mix that with Noguchi’s brilliant sets and the great costumes originally designed by Halston … There’s no-way to fully utilize or explore that with the justice deserved within an abbreviated time frame…What’s next, someone deciding to redo Picasso’s blue period in shades of red…

Adonis Foniadakis’ Echo I can still see in my mind’s eye. The work was inspired by the Greek myth of Narcissus and Echo but it is not a retelling of their story. Lloyd Mayor as Narcissus struggles with his reflection, Lorenzo Pagano. They move together as one, sometimes intimately, sometimes almost violently…a struggle with self, what to except, what to reject.

Martha Graham Dance Company in Andonis Foniadakis’s “Echo”.

Martha Graham Dance Company in Andonis Foniadakis’s “Echo”.

In the myth, Narcissus falls in love with his reflection in a pool of water and the reference of water is found in Mr. Foniadakis’ flowing movements and fluidity of shape. The dancing is fast and continuous, the choreography forged with twisting curves while the torso arches in mid-motion. A certain freedom that is denied within the confines of the formalized Graham technique defines the work. Witnessing other choreographers work with the Graham trained dancers, you see the beauty of the technique, the use of contractions and the way the spine spirals. Excellent work by a truly talented choreographer…

Martha Graham completed her last work, Maple Leaf Rag to the music of Scott Joplin at the age of 96. In her early career, when she got stuck creatively and feel into a funk she would ask Louis Horst, who was Ms. Graham’s music director, friend and mentor in her early years, to play the Maple Leaf Rag. You hear Ms. Graham’s recorded voice saying, ”Oh, Louis, play me the ‘Maple Leaf Rag.’

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Ying Xin & Lorenzo Pagano in Martha Graham’s “Maple Leaf Rag”

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Ying Xin & Lorenzo Pagano in Martha Graham’s “Maple Leaf Rag”

There is a light heartedness to the piece, its Ms. Graham poking fun at herself in ways that only she can get away with. A somber figure in a white dress crosses the stage as an ominous beat is heard with every step, then Joplin is heard and joyous dancing breaks out behind her…. Maple Leaf Rag is Ms. Graham’s last work and also one of her best…..

Satellite Collective Presents Manuel Vignoulle’s “Rituals” at BAM’s Fisher Hall, May 16th & 17th, 2014….

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Martha Graham Dance Company’s Program B at New York City Center 2014….

Martha Graham Dance Company “The Rite of Spring” Photo: Sinru Ku

Martha Graham Dance Company in “The Rite of Spring” Photo: Sinru Ku

The Martha Graham Dance Company has been almost swallowed up and spit into non-existence more times than once….I think it’s fair to say that in the company’s 88 years of existence being boxed up and boarded up has been an almost more than few times.…A recent as 2012, Hurricane Sandy poured the deep, dirty waters of the Hudson River into the basement of Westbeth, flooding the storage area of the company’s new home….leaving submerged for six days historical artifacts collected over the past 80 years, costumes worn by Martha Graham, renowned sets by Isamu Noguchi plus expensive tour equipment…all costing a pretty penny, approximated at over $4 million.

But, under the guidance of its Artistic Director Janet Eilber and Executive Director LaRue Allen, the Martha Graham Dance Company has been kept afloat and like a Phoenix from the ashes, rises ever again….

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Katherine Crockett in  Martha Graham's “Appalachian Spring” Photo: John Deane

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Katherine Crockett in Martha Graham’s “Appalachian Spring” Photo: John Deane

The Company’s 88th Season was labeled Myth and Transformation, revered Graham masterpieces were seen alongside newly commissioned work  by two of the world’s foremost choreographers… Andonis Foniadakis and Nacho Duato.

This season marked the 70th anniversary of Martha Graham’s Appalachian Spring. With sets by Isamu Noguchi and thanks to Erick Hawkins (who was to wed Ms. Graham’s in 1948), he persuaded Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge to subsidize the commissioned score by Aaron Copland  and which was to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music in 1945.  A subtle nod to the Shakers can be found in the melody of Copland’s score, the austerity of the Isamu Noguchi’s sets and Ms. Graham’s simplicity in way she approached the choreography.

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Abdiel Jacobsen in Martha Graham’s “Appalachian Spring”

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Abdiel Jacobsen in Martha Graham’s “Appalachian Spring”

Appalachian Spring has become an American classic and is Ms. Graham’s ode to American optimism and determination in an era when the country needed it dearly. The work premiered in 1944, World War II had been raging since 1939, 110,000 Japanese Americans were interned in “War Relocation Camps”, the Hartford Circus Fire occurred and killed over a 100 children and with Operation Normandy or D-Day, over 4000 allied troops are killed with almost half of them American. With headlines like that the country was in need of optimism…

Appalachian Spring is ripe with the imagery of the American pioneers, people who were moving west to settle new territories, to start over, to rebuild their lives. Lloyd Knight as the Preacher walks on stage, both solemn and filled with self-importance with four women, his followers, in lock step behind him. He is a frontier evangelist, sharing images of hellfire and doom to any who disagree with him.

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Lloyd Knight & Natasha Diamond-Walker in Nacho Duato’s “Depak Ine” Photo: Costas

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Lloyd Knight & Natasha Diamond-Walker in Nacho Duato’s “Depak Ine”

Katherine Crocket, as the Pioneering Woman displayed a certain dignity, her role was to advise and act as protector, the wiser older woman. Black White-McGuire as the Bride and Abdiel Jacobsen as the Husband bring a youthful exuberance, a young couple that sees infinite possibilities before them.

The minimalism of Isamu Noguchi’s set reflects or at least hints of the Shakers influence. Stark simplicity is found in the use of lines and angles. The farmhouse, seen only from a side view, rakes towards the back of the stage, upon its porch is an abstract interpretation of a the rocking chair, thin, austere and looks as if it’s constructed of rusted metal. A section of fence, like a rodeo corral, extends into oblivion…

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Lloyd Knight, Lorenzo Pagano, & Ying Xin in Nacho Duato’s “Depak Ine” Photo: Costas

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Lloyd Knight, Lorenzo Pagano, & Ying Xin in Nacho Duato’s “Depak Ine”

Appalachian Spring is work of undoubted historical importance, both in dance history, as well as the American experience. Yet the stiff, formalized approach in the use of the body in space, plus Ms. Graham’s application of straight lines and ninety degree angles to move the dancers across the stage, seemed out of date. Where Ms. Graham’s 1935 solo Imperial Gesture or her 1981 neoclassic Acts of Light have stood the test of time and can stand against anything created by any of today’s foremost choreographers, Appalachian Spring unfortunately does not…

Nacho Duato’s works speaks to me like few others, whether it is his 1983 work Jardi Tancat, his 1998 work Without Words or my favorite Duende from 1991, his genius is evident. His latest work, Depak Ine, commissioned by the Martha Graham Dance Company, perfectly aligned within my estimations of Ms. Duato’s talents. Janet Eilber has said at the beginning of the performance that Mr. Duato mentioned he was reading the works of Darwin while thinking about the new project.

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Lorenzo Pagano & Ying Xin in Nacho Duato’s Depak Ine” Photo: Costas

Martha Graham Dance Company’s Lorenzo Pagano & Ying Xin in Nacho Duato’s Depak Ine”

Mr. Duato’s readings of Darwin are evident in the choreography, the use of animalistic and insect-like movements and the dancers moving as if controlled by a hive mind. Like ants, they worked in concert, grouping together, one on top of the other, doing what was necessary to achieve their desired goals.

Created in only five-weeks and using the music of John Talabot, the Graham dancers proved how truly gifted they are when they threw themselves through space while maintaining complete control of their bodies. The work was a perfect contrast to the formalism found in the Graham technique, being more relaxed in its approach towards the movement of the body in space. It was a surprising and refreshing work that was brilliantly performed by the Graham dancers and a great addition to the Graham company’s repertory.

Peiju Chien-Pott must be mentioned for her stellar performance. She moved in ways that repudiated the laws of human anatomy, her body seemed devoid of bones, she became an object of infused energy, heedless of the strictures of nature, her dancing was filled with vitality and breath. Ms. Pott was mesmerizing… brava and brava again…

The Rite of Spring, in its 30th Anniversary, is just as strong today as when it premiere in 1984. The formalized use of body and the strict use of patterns to move the dancers across the that had seemed out of date in Appalachian Spring, was the perfect juxtaposition needed for the controlled chaos that is the Stravinsky score.

Martha Graham Dance Company’s in Martha Graham’s “The Rite of Spring” Photo: Sinru Ku

Martha Graham Dance Company’s in Martha Graham’s “The Rite of Spring” Photo: Sinru Ku

Ben Schultz as the Shaman towered over the lesser mortals, majestic and commanding and his tattoos complemented the sense of paganism that was seen. As the Chosen One, Xiaochuan Xie, with her hands bound, tenses her body with terror, knowing all to well her destiny.

The women are almost secondary, accepting a more submissive role within this male-dominated society. The enter and exit the stage, conscientious of what is occurring and all too aware of the role they are to play. The men, wearing  nothing but black briefs, circle the Chosen One, contracting their torsos with force showing their strength.

Ms. Graham’s Rite of Spring is primal in it’s intensity, raw emotion flows through and around the dancers. It is the sacrificial virgin, a young woman whose blood must flow to insure a bountiful harvest. It is the view of a death that gives life, her death ensures that others’ live…

 

Michele Wiles & Drew Jacoby performing Mauro Bigonzetti’s “La Follia”….

La Follia

Dancers: Michele Wiles & Drew Jacoby

Choreography: Mauro Bigonzetti

Music: Vivaldi.

Performance from the inaugural event presented by Ballet Next at The Joyce Theater

Nov. 2011, New York City

BalletNext 2014 Spring Master Classes….

Ballet Next

$30 Master Class

$70 Three-class Series

10:15am – 12pm

Advanced & Professional Dancers 

Sunday April 6: Michele Wiles

michele

Michele Wiles Artistic Director of BalletNext and former principal dancer with American Ballet Theatre.

Sunday May 4: Kaitlyn Gilliland 

Kaitlyn

Kaitlyn Gilliland BalletNext dancer, SAB faculty member, and former New York City Ballet dancer

Sunday June 1: Stephen Hanna

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Stephen Hanna BalletNext Dancer, former New York City Ballet principal and original cast member of Billy Elliot

City Center • Studio 5

130 W56th St

New York

 Click Here To Pre-register

 or Pay at the Door

 

Christopher-Jean Maillot’s LAC (after Swan Lake) & Les Ballets de Monte Carlo at the New York City Center….

Les Ballets de Monte Carlo’s Anja Behrend in Christopher-Jean Maillot’s LAC (after Swan Lake). Photo: Alice Blangero

Les Ballets de Monte Carlo’s Anja Behrend in Christopher-Jean Maillot’s LAC (after Swan Lake). Photo: Alice Blanger

Re-working a classic story ballet such as Swan Lake is a risk, a great risk, but Christopher-Jean Maillot’s LAC (after Swan Lake) and Les Ballets de Monte Carlo have done just that. Mr. Maillot has created a fresh face for a centuries old ballet. One may ask, “Why do this?” and one may answer “Why not…”

After all, historically speaking this would not be the first time Swan Lake has been recreated. Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake, composed in 1875 as a commission by Vladimir Petrovich Begichev, the intendant of the Russian Imperial Theatres in Moscow was a bit of a flop. Much like Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker, that Swan Lake was unsuccessful after its first year of performance.

Tchaikovsky’s score was considered too complicated, dancing to it was difficult and the original choreography by Julius Reisinger, the German ballet master for the Ballet of Moscow Imperial Bolshoi Theatre was considered drab, nothing to write home about. No remaining records exist of that version of Swan Lake, just random mentions in surviving letters from that period.

Les Ballets de Monte Carlo’s Bruno Roque (left), Maude Sabourin & Asier Edesoby in Christopher-Jean Maillot’s LAC (after Swan Lake). Photo: Alice Blangero

Les Ballets de Monte Carlo’s Bruno Roque (left), Maude Sabourin & Asier Edesoby in Christopher-Jean Maillot’s LAC (after Swan Lake). Photo: Alice Blangero

It wasn’t until after Tchaikovsky’s death (1893) that Swan Lake was revived. Much of the Swan Lake we know of today is from that revision by the famous choreographers Petipa and Ivanov that was first performed in 1895.

Mr. Maillot, with the assistance of the award-winning French novelist Jean Rouaud acting as dramaturge, has created a hip and current retelling of the 1895 classic… infused with light battling dark, good versus evil.

The story begins with a grainy black and white film, a remembered time when the prince as a young boy is on a picnic with the King and Queen (who are masked…) to celebrate his birthday. They meet a very pretty girl, all in white, they also come in contact with a darkly attired woman and her little girl. The Prince becomes immediately infatuated with the young girl in white as she coyly gives him a kiss on the check. Pandemonium ensues as the white clad young girl is swept away by black clad winged creatures that are in league with the dark clad woman…

The film ends and the ballet beings in the midst of a Grand Ball, The Majesty of Night, (Maillot’s version of the evil sorcerer Von Rothbart), excellently portrayed by April Ball, appears in all her glory with her two male and very sexy Black Angels (Christian Tworzyanski and Ediz Eroguc). In tow is also the Black Swan (Noelani Pantastico), who has been transformed into a young girl. Tensions arise for the Majesty of Night is rumored to have had a romantic tryst with the King (Gabriele Corrado) and some even whisper that he may be the father to the Black Swan. Needless to say, the Queen (Mi Deng) is less than thrilled she has shown up.

Lucien Postlewaite was everything a romantic prince should be, handsome and heroic, his dancing superb especially during the touching duet with the White Swan, Anjafa Ballesteros. Ms. Ballesteros portrayed a creature that was noble but touched somewhat by sadness. You felt her plight and your emotions went out to her.

Ernest Pignon-Ernest’s impeccable sets must be mentioned for he has created a world of where dreams could come alive. He played on light and dark, gray was not a color but became a mood. The meeting place between the Prince and the White Swan seemed more a place of purgatory where purity struggled to exist.

Les Ballets de Monte Carlo’s Mimoza Koike & Alvaro Prieto in Christopher-Jean Maillot’s LAC (after Swan Lake). Photo: Doug Gifford

Les Ballets de Monte Carlo’s Mimoza Koike & Alvaro Prieto in Christopher-Jean Maillot’s LAC (after Swan Lake). Photo: Doug Gifford

Philipe Guillotel’s costumes were the bow that completed the package. He was able to use the concept of classical costumes, tutus and tiaras without becoming lost in them. He updated them so they were current and on trend. For the swans their arms were transformed in to the suggestion of wings, where there would be fingers were now feathers. The Majesty of Night was costumed in a way that made her seem bigger than life, more menacing but still beautiful.

The Majesty of Night’s accomplices, the Black Angels were demonic and yet very sexy. If you were to encounter them outside the theater…for a confusing moment you may question…. should you flee for your life or perhaps ask them out for for a drink…talk about internal struggle.

Christopher-Jean Maillot’s LAC (after Swan Lake) has all the makings of a modern day classic. A Swan Lake that today’s generation can embrace. A world of intrigue, fashion, sex and daring…

Paul Taylor’s Arden Court (1981 Performance) with David Parson & Daniel Ezralow ….

Arden Court

Paul Taylor Dance Company

1981 Performance with David Parson & Daniel Ezralow

Choreography: Paul Taylor

Music: William Boyce

Set & Costumes: Gene Moore

Lighting: Jennifer Tipton

Premiered: April 15, 1981

“One of the few great art works created in [the 20th] century… exploring a new movement field of love and relationship. The women dance into the men’s arms as if Shakespeare had only written Romeo and Juliet the day before yesterday. I am convinced that this is one of the sentimental works of our time… something extraordinary in the history of dance. It bounces to a different drummer.” – Clive Barnes, New York Post

 

Ailey II 40th Anniversary Two-Week New York Season at the Ailey Citigroup Theater, April 2 – April 13, 2014….

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Ailey II Celebrates 40th Anniversary

The Ailey Citigroup Theater

Inspiring Young Company Performs 2 Programs of 3 New Works & 4 Repertory Favorites in 14 Performances

April 2 – April 13, 2014

All New Program

Adam Barruch’s Alchemies,

Katarzyna Skarpetowska’s  Cuore Sott’olio

Jennifer Archibald’s Wings

Returning Favorites

Alvin Ailey’s Streams,

Artistic Director Robert Battle’ We

Benoit-Swan Pouffer’ Rusty

Amy Hall Garner’s Virtues

Week 1

Wednesday, April 2, 2014 at 7:30pm – All New

Thursday, April 3, 2014 at 7:30pm – Returning Favorites

Friday, April 4, 2014 at 8pm – All New

Saturday, April 5, 2014 (matinee) at 3pm – Returning Favorites

Saturday, April 5, 2014 (evening) at 8pm – All New

Sunday, April 6, 2014 (matinee) at 3pm – All New

Sunday, April 6, 2014 (evening) at 7:30pm – Returning Favorites

Week 2

Wednesday April 9, 2014 at 7:30pm – Returning Favorites

Thursday, April 10, 2014 at 7:30pm – All New

Friday, April 11, 2014 at 8pm – Returning Favorites

Saturday, April 12, 2014 (matinee) at 3pm – All New

Saturday, April 12, 2014 (evening) at 8pm – Returning Favorites

Sunday, April 13, 2014 (matinee) at 3pm – All New

Sunday, April 13, 2014 (evening) at 7:30pm – All New

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THE AILEY CITIGROUP THEATER

405 West 55th Street (at 9th Avenue)
New York, NY 10019

For Info & Tkts